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Website Upgrade

My website went through a recent upgrade! Images will now display with a caption. I know this sounds like a simple modification, however I feel that most of my work requires some sort of title or caption. For example, the Acadia IV work is named based on the trail/location and what is depicted. I also arranged the images in chronological order of each hike. Now you can see how the terrain changes along the trail! Another place I think the captions will help is the Toy Camera gallery. I added the type of camera used to make each image to the title. Overall, I hope this upgrade enhances your experience on my website!

I hope this enhances your experience on my site!

http://ericbaileyphotography.com/

Tags: upgrade
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Acadia - Behind The Scenes II
Natcho at Acadia Mountain Summit
To read more, please visit: http://ericbaileyphotography.com/2014/03/acadia-behind-the-scenes-ii.html

Acadia - Behind The Scenes II

Natcho at Acadia Mountain Summit

To read more, please visit: http://ericbaileyphotography.com/2014/03/acadia-behind-the-scenes-ii.html

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Acadia - Behind the Scenes I
Natcho at Dorr Mountain Summit
To read more, please visit http://ericbaileyphotography.com/2014/03/acadia-behind-the-scenes-i.html

Acadia - Behind the Scenes I

Natcho at Dorr Mountain Summit

To read more, please visit http://ericbaileyphotography.com/2014/03/acadia-behind-the-scenes-i.html

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Natcho at World’s End
Yashica 124 with Velvia 100
If you have seen previous blog posts on my site or if you follow me on Instagram, you might notice that I take a lot of photographs of a green octopus named Natcho. For a while, I have been uploading photographs of Natcho but I never thought to formally explain why I do so. I imagine some folks have thought “What is the deal with this Natcho character?”. I wanted to take a moment to formally explain myself.
Natcho began as a gift to my fiancee (girlfriend at the time). We have an inside joke with octopi, so it made for a great gift. Shortly afterward, we would bring him on with us when we went out and snap a photo at the destination. It was a fun way to document an outing or day trip. Months later, we went on a trip to Yosemite National Park and brought Natcho along. I thought it would be fun to bring him along on hikes, and photograph him at various points of interest. It had such a fun time making a point to photograph Natcho, that from then on I wanted to bring him on every trip. It was in Yosemite that Natcho became my official adventure buddy. Now I bring him along on hikes, day trips, or vacations. I know this probably sounds kind of lame, and I might need to read a self-help book. However, I think it’s a fun way to document my travels. So there you have it. What began with an inside joke, developed into an ongoing photo gag (no pun intended).
There will be many photographs of Natcho to come. I have some “Behind The Scenes” images prepared to go up in the wake of my most recent work from Acadia National Park. Stay tuned.

Natcho at World’s End

Yashica 124 with Velvia 100

If you have seen previous blog posts on my site or if you follow me on Instagram, you might notice that I take a lot of photographs of a green octopus named Natcho. For a while, I have been uploading photographs of Natcho but I never thought to formally explain why I do so. I imagine some folks have thought “What is the deal with this Natcho character?”. I wanted to take a moment to formally explain myself.

Natcho began as a gift to my fiancee (girlfriend at the time). We have an inside joke with octopi, so it made for a great gift. Shortly afterward, we would bring him on with us when we went out and snap a photo at the destination. It was a fun way to document an outing or day trip. Months later, we went on a trip to Yosemite National Park and brought Natcho along. I thought it would be fun to bring him along on hikes, and photograph him at various points of interest. It had such a fun time making a point to photograph Natcho, that from then on I wanted to bring him on every trip. It was in Yosemite that Natcho became my official adventure buddy. Now I bring him along on hikes, day trips, or vacations. I know this probably sounds kind of lame, and I might need to read a self-help book. However, I think it’s a fun way to document my travels. So there you have it. What began with an inside joke, developed into an ongoing photo gag (no pun intended).

There will be many photographs of Natcho to come. I have some “Behind The Scenes” images prepared to go up in the wake of my most recent work from Acadia National Park. Stay tuned.

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Today, I am pleased to announce that my fourth installment of photographs from Acadia National Park is now on my website. 
Here is a link: Acadia IV
If you do take a look a the work, feel free to comment on this post or message me with your thoughts. I am interested in any thoughts or opinions you might have about the work, even if you fell asleep by the end of the slideshow. Any feedback is appreciated! Enjoy!

Today, I am pleased to announce that my fourth installment of photographs from Acadia National Park is now on my website. 

Here is a link: Acadia IV

If you do take a look a the work, feel free to comment on this post or message me with your thoughts. I am interested in any thoughts or opinions you might have about the work, even if you fell asleep by the end of the slideshow. Any feedback is appreciated! Enjoy!

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Countdown Until New Work From Acadia National Park Goes Live: 1 Day

Countdown Until New Work From Acadia National Park Goes Live: 1 Day

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Countdown Until New Work From Acadia National Park Goes Live: 2 Days

Countdown Until New Work From Acadia National Park Goes Live: 2 Days

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Countdown Until New Acadia Work Goes Live: 3 Days

Countdown Until New Acadia Work Goes Live: 3 Days

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Countdown Until New Acadia Work Goes Live: 4 Days

Countdown Until New Acadia Work Goes Live: 4 Days

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Countdown Until New Acadia Work Goes Live: 5 Days

Countdown Until New Acadia Work Goes Live: 5 Days

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Acadia Sneak Preview III
Acadia Mountain Trail no. 2 – Flying Mountain Showing Its Namesake
The weather played a major role in shaping my photographs from Acadia this time around. For the first five days I was on the island, the conditions were overcast with fog and occasional showers. I know it sounds like the worst conditions for landscape, but I found that it was the opposite. The clouds diffused the sun light, making for soft light on the forest floor. In places where I would have normally had harsh dark shadows and blown out highlights, I had nice even lighting to pickup the subtleties normally lost on a sunny day. Not to mention, we could hike all day and not overheat because it stayed fairly cool during the day. Moving up in elevation away from the forest floor yielded some wild lighting conditions and photo opportunities. While climbing certain mountains, visibility was low because of the low clouds. This meant we did not have the normal panoramic views of the island in the distance. However, it caused you to focus on your immediate surroundings. I photographed colorful plants and flowers that grow in between the boulders and rocks. I also observed mist collecting in the needles of conifer trees, which quickly condensed and formed mini rain showers within the tree. This same effect happened to me, except my arm hairs collected the moisture simulating air conditioning. I know that sounds gross, but it is heaven if you just climbed up a mountain and want to cool off fast. As the wind pushed the clouds around, sometimes I was lucky enough to see the fog clear on certain areas of the park. I would never have captured the above photograph of Flying Mountain literally floating above the clouds if it had been a bright sunny day. Seeing flying mountain above the clouds is also extremely unusual given that its summit is only at 284 feet. It is by no means the Mount Everest of Acadia National Park, but I feel that is important to give the mountain it’s place in the sun regardless of height.

Acadia Sneak Preview III

Acadia Mountain Trail no. 2 – Flying Mountain Showing Its Namesake

The weather played a major role in shaping my photographs from Acadia this time around. For the first five days I was on the island, the conditions were overcast with fog and occasional showers. I know it sounds like the worst conditions for landscape, but I found that it was the opposite. The clouds diffused the sun light, making for soft light on the forest floor. In places where I would have normally had harsh dark shadows and blown out highlights, I had nice even lighting to pickup the subtleties normally lost on a sunny day. Not to mention, we could hike all day and not overheat because it stayed fairly cool during the day. Moving up in elevation away from the forest floor yielded some wild lighting conditions and photo opportunities. While climbing certain mountains, visibility was low because of the low clouds. This meant we did not have the normal panoramic views of the island in the distance. However, it caused you to focus on your immediate surroundings. I photographed colorful plants and flowers that grow in between the boulders and rocks. I also observed mist collecting in the needles of conifer trees, which quickly condensed and formed mini rain showers within the tree. This same effect happened to me, except my arm hairs collected the moisture simulating air conditioning. I know that sounds gross, but it is heaven if you just climbed up a mountain and want to cool off fast. As the wind pushed the clouds around, sometimes I was lucky enough to see the fog clear on certain areas of the park. I would never have captured the above photograph of Flying Mountain literally floating above the clouds if it had been a bright sunny day. Seeing flying mountain above the clouds is also extremely unusual given that its summit is only at 284 feet. It is by no means the Mount Everest of Acadia National Park, but I feel that is important to give the mountain it’s place in the sun regardless of height.

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Acadia Sneak Preview II
Cadillac South Ridge Trail no. 8 – The Featherbed
As I post sneak preview photographs from Acadia, you might notice the manner in which I chose to name each image. The first part of the title is a trail or location where the shot was taken followed by what it depicted. I chose this blockbuster style of naming my work to tell the viewer where I took it, so that perhaps one day they can see it for themselves. I do this not only to try to motivate folks to visit the park, but also highlight the wonderful sites one can take in during the course of a hike. I feel that showing the photographs in sequence by trail also shows the diverse landscape one can see while traveling through the park. This is also underscores the way I chose to depict the park. I want to show the viewer that the scenes found trailside or in the distance that are not commonly found on postcards can be just as beautiful as those that are.
On a less serious note, I also like my super literal naming method because I do not have it in me to generate something hyper poetic or dramatic about each photograph I take in the park. I have seen folks do this for landscape work, but I feel can render the image borderline cheesy. For example, if I was to rename the above photograph (dead tree next to a pond) using the dramatic method it would be called something like “Nature’s Outcast”. See what I mean?

Acadia Sneak Preview II

Cadillac South Ridge Trail no. 8 – The Featherbed

As I post sneak preview photographs from Acadia, you might notice the manner in which I chose to name each image. The first part of the title is a trail or location where the shot was taken followed by what it depicted. I chose this blockbuster style of naming my work to tell the viewer where I took it, so that perhaps one day they can see it for themselves. I do this not only to try to motivate folks to visit the park, but also highlight the wonderful sites one can take in during the course of a hike. I feel that showing the photographs in sequence by trail also shows the diverse landscape one can see while traveling through the park. This is also underscores the way I chose to depict the park. I want to show the viewer that the scenes found trailside or in the distance that are not commonly found on postcards can be just as beautiful as those that are.

On a less serious note, I also like my super literal naming method because I do not have it in me to generate something hyper poetic or dramatic about each photograph I take in the park. I have seen folks do this for landscape work, but I feel can render the image borderline cheesy. For example, if I was to rename the above photograph (dead tree next to a pond) using the dramatic method it would be called something like “Nature’s Outcast”. See what I mean?